Sceptically Fit

18/02/2012

News around the web

Filed under: Exercise, Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 12:44

Have you registered for the Paleo Summit – its being advertised as a virtual Paleo conference. I’ve signed up, it will be interesting to see how it turns out.

A look at breaking the exercise to eat cycle. Eating and Exercise are not morally loaded actions but so many treat them that way.

Realize that you do not need permission to eat. You don’t have to earn your calories. You’re a beautiful person worthy of eating just by virtue of existing. Even if you do nothing but sit on your butt, you have earned the right to eat and to eat food that is enjoyable.

Exercise is not punishment. You should find a way to move your body that you enjoy. While no exercise is 100% fun 100% of the time, I’m convinced everyone can find a way to be active that is challenging, fulfilling and mostly fun. If you hate running, please don’t run! (And to my readers who love running – you keep on running, I don’t mean you!) Dance, hike, bike or join a synchronized swim team (and then tell me how they get all that makeup to stay on in the pool!) but find something you love.

 

An interview with  female powerlifter, Jean Fry :

Of course! My most recent meet was about 6 weeks ago (at the Powerstation Pro-Am), marking my 4-yr anniversary at Westside. I squatted 415lbs and deadlifted 375lbs at a body-weight of 123lbs; I also scraped out a pro total with 1025lbs (despite having a terrible bench day). My best benches to date are 250lbs at a body-weight of 123lbs and 230lbs at a body-weight of 114lbs.

 

Mark Sisson looks at the need to eat brightly coloured vegetables and sulfur rich vegetables. While  artificial antioxidant supplementation continues to be shown as useless.

Stumptuous looks at the need to eat meat. Over at Hunt, Gather, Love – a review of Why Women Need Fat. Gnolls.org examines why humans became smarter rather than just more numerous.

More evidence that exercise doesn’t have to be time consuming, just hard – yes its interval training!

Not Just a Man looks at a couple of studies:

Activity levels affect bone density in women.

As expected, bone density by the BUA measurement increases noticeably with the increase in activity levels.  While VOS also increases, it doesn’t seem to be a significant movement so perhaps activity levels only really impact the structure of the bone rather than its elasticity and exact mineral content?

Strength training and adiposity in Women:

Moving over to the training group there is a much bigger reduction in body fat percentage with almost double the lean mass gains seen by the control group and a statistically significant reduction in fat mass when compared to the control group.  Despite the adherence drop-off in training during year two that was so evident in the strength measurements, the lean mass mostly remained with the trainees, although body fat started to return in year two.  Despite this, the body fat did return at a slower rate than the control group were putting it on, perhaps thanks to the additional muscle the trainees were carrying in year two.

Strength training has also been linked to better cancer survival rates. Exercise also seems to trigger stem cell growth in muscles, as well as just making you feel damn good

A look at the continually changing role of marriage in human society.

A study looks at the role of compression pants in recovery. They found a statistically significant advantage but at this point can only hypothesise as why.

Rob Wolff looks at how to carb-load.

Skeptic North calls for an end to funding of CAM* in education (*psuedoscience and superstition masquerading as health care).

An account of dealing with the creepy

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24/01/2012

Loren Cordain – Origins and Evolution of the Western Diet: Health Implications for the 21st Century

Filed under: Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 00:21

I stumbled across a fascinating lecture by Dr Loren Cordain looking at human evolution and their diet, and how that affects our modern health.

22/01/2012

A very prolific week of links…

Filed under: Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 22:39

Another reason to exercise – it helps your body get rid of damaged or degraded cells.  And while exercise preserves muscle – it only preserves the muscle you use so don’t stop the full body routines… and sorry to disappoint – stretching doesn’t stop the doms.

How to ensure good gut health.

A new study suggests the marathon won’t kill you (if you’ve trained for it). Mark Sisson gives some advice on combining weight training with running, and here are some more tips to run faster.

A study postulating that most of humanity evolved with carbohydrate scarcity causing a greater insulin resistance to be selected for which is now what presupposes many ethnic groups for type2 diabetes.

Looking into the wider animal kingdom – researchers have discovered predators will hunt to ensure a nutritionally balanced diet.

Morning People – that’s as good as you’re going to be. Me, my brain’s just warming up!

Conditioning Research takes a look at the importance of sleep and its effect on obesity.

Evolvify takes a look at the (lack of) evidence behind the women like alpha males theory in pickup culture.

Despite being the ready energy source of many – another study suggests avoiding carbohydrates will help you stay awake.

Lifehacker looks at the science behind a bad mood.

From Not Just a Man’s World – a look at a study on the effects of resistance training on flexibility for young women.

Loren Cordain answers a few questions on the paleo diet – its going to take me a while to get through his paper on Cereal Grains.

A good reminder of the power of the placebo.

21/01/2012

Thoughts on trying to plan Running and Nutrition

Filed under: Personal — Tags: , , , — Sceptically Me @ 18:04

When I first started exercising I oscillated heavily between lots of enthusiasm and heavy procrastination. This was especially so with anything cardio related – weights are so much easy for me to force myself to do. When I first started running I continued my lazy technique of rolling out of bed, put your gym clothes on, walk the five mins it takes to get there and be halfway through your workout before you’ve really woken up. With running, I would pull on clothes, jog to the nearby park, do a few stretches and then do my 5-12km run. And this worked pretty well  for up to 12km. After that I started having to look into eating beforehand taking water/carbohydrate drinks with me.

One thing I still have problems with is eating when I get back. This morning I finished off my last paleo chocolate coconut pudding before the run to make it a bit easier. Even though I took it pretty gently (11km in 1hr 15) fighting the wind meant it was a hard run for large parts. It just seemed to take ages to cool down and stretch, and then I thought I’d wait till after my shower to make something to eat. Well, I’ll put some coffee on and then I’ll cook something. By the time I sat down with my bowl of coconut prawn soup I was feeling woozy.

Would I have been better to just get up and go and save the pudding for when I got back? As I start looking to up my mileage on the weekend should I be looking to have food ready to eat when I get back – something like paleo muffins?

On the plus side with today’s running is, despite the wind, it felt easier than last week when I barely made 6km. I still walked the steepest part of the hill (a fact I don’t care about) but I didn’t feel like I was exhausted or my legs are giving up on me. My last two days of comfort eating had meant I’d upped my carbs a bit although I had intended to try that anyway. And I think it helped. With the amount of exercise I’m aiming to be doing I think its better for me to be eating closer to the 100-150gm rather than 50-100gm. At least on the days I am actually exercising. I also measured myself this morning (during that will I run outside/go to the gym decision making) and have lost another half centimetre of my waist, hips and thighs. So its not like eating more carbs have hindered me that way either.

 

22/10/2011

Carbohydrates not Saturated fat biggest risk factor for Cardiovascular Disease

Filed under: Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 23:54

Another study just published that showing the link between high glycemic  foods and heart disease, not saturated fat.

Abstract

The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in observational cohorts, while replacing SAFA with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is associated with reduced CVD risk. However, replacing a combination of SAFA and trans-fatty acids with n-6 PUFA (notably linoleic acid) in controlled trials showed no indication of benefit and a signal toward increased coronary heart disease risk, suggesting that n-3 PUFA may be responsible for the protective association between total PUFA and CVD. High CHO intakes stimulate hepatic SAFA synthesis and conservation of dietary SAFA . Hepatic de novo lipogenesis from CHO is also stimulated during eucaloric dietary substitution of SAFA by CHO with high glycaemic index in normo-insulinaemic subjects and during hypocaloric high-CHO÷low-fat diets in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. The accumulation of SAFA stimulates chronic systemic low-grade inflammation through its mimicking of bacterial lipopolysaccharides and÷or the induction of other pro-inflammatory stimuli. The resulting systemic low-grade inflammation promotes insulin resistance, reallocation of energy-rich substrates and atherogenic dyslipidaemia that concertedly give rise to increased CVD risk. We conclude that avoidance of SAFA accumulation by reducing the intake of CHO with high glycaemic index is more effective in the prevention of CVD than reducing SAFA intake per se.

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