Sceptically Fit

21/04/2012

A month of links

Filed under: Exercise, Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 14:38

Its been a busy month (and a half) for me – more on that in another post – but its been a busy time in the world of health and fitness.

The Meat will kill you Study: I’d jump straight in with a comment from Gary Taubes and  Silverhydra’s interpretation   before rounding it out with a post from Mark Sisson. And a heart surgeon speaks out – what really causes heart disease.

More on the use it or lose it

“We control 70 per cent of how we age,” she says. “The other 30 per cent is genetic, and we can blame our mothers for that. But 70 per cent is in our hands.”

Omega 3 supplementation is recommended for a lot of people – but you can over do it. And more reasons to supplement with vitamin d.

Do you remember to use the foam roller on your upper body?

Wheat – more ways it damages you. And a look at the spectrum of gluten sensitivity disorders.

Given my diet for the last month or so, I’m not surprised that evidence keeps emerging that lack of sleep causes you to overeat.

A study suggests women are more susceptible to hormonally induced hunger after exercise. And another study looks at the effect of resistance training on overall energy expenditure.

Its disappointing to watch my country’s educational institution’s reputations ruined by pseudoscience.

When will my gym start offering Kitty-robics?

18/02/2012

News around the web

Filed under: Exercise, Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 12:44

Have you registered for the Paleo Summit – its being advertised as a virtual Paleo conference. I’ve signed up, it will be interesting to see how it turns out.

A look at breaking the exercise to eat cycle. Eating and Exercise are not morally loaded actions but so many treat them that way.

Realize that you do not need permission to eat. You don’t have to earn your calories. You’re a beautiful person worthy of eating just by virtue of existing. Even if you do nothing but sit on your butt, you have earned the right to eat and to eat food that is enjoyable.

Exercise is not punishment. You should find a way to move your body that you enjoy. While no exercise is 100% fun 100% of the time, I’m convinced everyone can find a way to be active that is challenging, fulfilling and mostly fun. If you hate running, please don’t run! (And to my readers who love running – you keep on running, I don’t mean you!) Dance, hike, bike or join a synchronized swim team (and then tell me how they get all that makeup to stay on in the pool!) but find something you love.

 

An interview with  female powerlifter, Jean Fry :

Of course! My most recent meet was about 6 weeks ago (at the Powerstation Pro-Am), marking my 4-yr anniversary at Westside. I squatted 415lbs and deadlifted 375lbs at a body-weight of 123lbs; I also scraped out a pro total with 1025lbs (despite having a terrible bench day). My best benches to date are 250lbs at a body-weight of 123lbs and 230lbs at a body-weight of 114lbs.

 

Mark Sisson looks at the need to eat brightly coloured vegetables and sulfur rich vegetables. While  artificial antioxidant supplementation continues to be shown as useless.

Stumptuous looks at the need to eat meat. Over at Hunt, Gather, Love – a review of Why Women Need Fat. Gnolls.org examines why humans became smarter rather than just more numerous.

More evidence that exercise doesn’t have to be time consuming, just hard – yes its interval training!

Not Just a Man looks at a couple of studies:

Activity levels affect bone density in women.

As expected, bone density by the BUA measurement increases noticeably with the increase in activity levels.  While VOS also increases, it doesn’t seem to be a significant movement so perhaps activity levels only really impact the structure of the bone rather than its elasticity and exact mineral content?

Strength training and adiposity in Women:

Moving over to the training group there is a much bigger reduction in body fat percentage with almost double the lean mass gains seen by the control group and a statistically significant reduction in fat mass when compared to the control group.  Despite the adherence drop-off in training during year two that was so evident in the strength measurements, the lean mass mostly remained with the trainees, although body fat started to return in year two.  Despite this, the body fat did return at a slower rate than the control group were putting it on, perhaps thanks to the additional muscle the trainees were carrying in year two.

Strength training has also been linked to better cancer survival rates. Exercise also seems to trigger stem cell growth in muscles, as well as just making you feel damn good

A look at the continually changing role of marriage in human society.

A study looks at the role of compression pants in recovery. They found a statistically significant advantage but at this point can only hypothesise as why.

Rob Wolff looks at how to carb-load.

Skeptic North calls for an end to funding of CAM* in education (*psuedoscience and superstition masquerading as health care).

An account of dealing with the creepy

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