Sceptically Fit

18/08/2012

Links this Week

Filed under: Exercise, Health and Nutrition — Tags: , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 12:42

An in-depth look at Non-Celiac Wheat Sensitivity at Hunter-Gatherer including the envy-inducing standard of care IBS sufferers received in Italy and the quality of controls.

Among those who were wheat sensitive, a high number of them tested positive on the cytomteric basophil activation test, and many also tested positive for serum IgG and IgA AGA tests. Many of these patients suffered from anemia and weight-loss. Biopsies showed eosinophil infiltration of the duodenal and colon mucosa.
, despite not having the type of villous atrophy damage associated with celiac.

There seemed to be two groups of IBS wheat-sensitive patients- those with wheat sensitivity alone and those with wheat sensitivity AND multiple other sensitivities to cow’s milk and other foods. The later group was also more likely to also have other types of allergies (non-food allergies, skin allergies, etc.) and a family history of allergies.

Acetylcholine is responsible for ahem, moving things along, so it might explain why wheat causes diarrhea in some people.

Also, it is notable that this study used wheat rather than gluten, so it might be other components of wheat like fructans that are responsible for the symptoms.

Dr Davis (of Wheat Belly) dismisses the benefit of sprouting grains.

It is folly to believe that such a process as simply allowing the seed to germinate somehow disables all the bad potential of modern wheat. It still contains the gliadin protein that clouds your thinking and stimulates appetite. It still contains glutens that disrupt intestinal health. It still contains amylopectin A that sends your blood sugar through the roof. It still contains lectins that disable the normal intestinal barriers to foreign substances. It still contains apha amylase, peroxidases, lipid-transfer proteins, and thioredoxins responsible for a variety of allergic phenomena.

An infographic on differences in sprinter’s vs marathoner’s bodies over time.

Proof that the plank is better than crunches.

There are two disadvantages to old-fashioned sit-ups and crunches. In the long term they are likely to lead to back problems because of the pressure they create on the discs between the vertebrae, and, more to the point, they are not very effective. The muscles in your midsection area are not so much meant for moving your torso, but above all to keep your torso stable when your spine is subject to tension.

Dr Loren Cordain in a discussion on the range of a paleo diet.

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14/08/2012

Comfort Food – Doing it Right

Filed under: Personal, Recipes — Tags: , , — Sceptically Me @ 20:20

Taking time to relax on my approach to food does feel like its working for me. I think my diet is settling into a more natural pattern – being aware of when I’m hungry as opposed to needy. Trying to keep wheat out of my diet as much as possible – my food journalling has made pretty clear that wheat has an unpleasant effect on how I feel physically and has suggested quite strongly a negative effect on how I feel emotionally. It seems there might be something to the intuitive eating theory that becoming aware of how something affects you will change your interest in eating it. I’m not trying to deny myself although I do need to ‘fight’ the urge for some wheat products. And fail at time although I the donut I ate at work was so unsatisfying I don’t think I’ll be tempted again for a while. I’m not trying to ‘diet’ or lose weight, but I am trying to feel good. So that means working towards a healthier diet, one that meets my emotional and physical needs.

A long day at work, and still nursing a badly sprained ankle, I was hungry and in need of something particularly comforting today. Part of me wanted to stop off at the shops and grab something – a big bag of crisps or something else equally snacky, a nice easy fix to the desire. But it wouldn’t really. Somehow, for the first time in a while, I was able to recognise that. Instead, I made myself sweet potato fries. And they were tasty:

Image

Sweet Potato Fries:

  • pre-heat oven to 200C
  • cut up a large sweet potato into sticks
  • melt a tablespoon of coconut oil
    on a tray
  • mix a generous amount of paprika, a little sprinkling of cayenne pepper to taste, and a little ground black pepper into the oil
  • roll the sweet potato in the oil and bake for approx 20min turning once.
  • sit down with a good book and enjoy

12/08/2012

Keep Free-Range Free-Range!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — Sceptically Me @ 21:17

Some producers in Australia are trying to change the legal definition of free-range so they can industrially farm chickens for eggs while still benefiting from the label free-range.
If you are in Australia – please sign the petition to keep eggs cruelty free

 

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Lots of Links

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 21:12

Evidence for non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Our data confirm the existence of non-celiac WS as a distinct clinical condition. We also suggest the existence of two distinct populations of subjects with WS: one with characteristics more similar to CD and the other with characteristics pointing to food allergy

Unfortunately not all the olympic coverage has been positive: female olympian fight back against body shaming.

More evidence emerges that meat eating is what allowed modern humans to evolve but of course the article includes unsupported advice not to eat mean…

More reasons to exercise – it causes the body to produce chemicals that prevent cancer.

Interesting developments in the theory of carb-loading. Seems three days of high carb, with high fat on the day offers the best fuelling for endurance exercise.

Another example of how unintuitive the human psyche is – it seems focussing on goals can actually detract from motivation. The key is to focus on enjoying the task at hand.

Fishbach and Choi think that staying focused on our goals detracts from the inherent pleasures of the activities we need to pursue to achieve those goals. Consistent with this, they found that the students at the gym who stayed focused on their goals tended to say afterwards that the exercise felt more of an effort, as compared with the students who were focused on the experience itself.

 

11/08/2012

Should you listen to your body?

Filed under: Personal — Tags: , , , , — Sceptically Me @ 21:19

Its idea I struggle with as I don’t really believe that I can trust my body.  And maybe its because I had labradors as the family pet, but I don’t really buy the argument that animals naturally know how much to eat either. That said, I’m intrigued and hopeful for the ideas of the paleo diet and intuitive eating. The question is, how to get there?
If I was a more egotistocal sort, I’d be thinking the universe is answering my questions. But for whatever reason, the blogging world has been helpfully dealing with these very questions.

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